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Your Ultimate Guide to The REVERSE FELTING NEEDLE

Have you ever tried a reverse felting needle?

You can use it to make fluffy fur, BUT there’s so MUCH MORE you can do with it too!

This video is your Ultimate Guide to the reverse felting needle.

In this needle felting tutorial I’ll show you what it is, what it can do. I’ll share top tips for how to get the most out of it and there may be some techniques you have never thought about!

I hope you enjoy it!

Please let me know what you might try to create with the reverse needle in the comments 🙂

The Reverse Felting Needle is a wonderful versatile tool and one of my all time favourite needles.

I get my needles from HeidiFeathers, they are brilliant in quality and all colour coded so you don’t lose track of which needle you are using! They deliver internationally and sell a variety of tools and fibres.

If you are starting out and don’t have any needles yet then it’s well worth getting a set of 30 Mixed Felting Needles – 10 Different types – Triangular, Star, Reverse & Twisted Needles https://amzn.to/3oSks9j

Or if you are looking to get individual needles then you can choose by needle type:

Reverse Felting Needles https://amzn.to/3apVPs6

Star 38G – https://amzn.to/2YC5xFe

Triangle 38G https://amzn.to/3oKvTPK

Triangle 40G https://amzn.to/2YEct4E

Twisted 38G https://amzn.to/3BuSund

Twisted 40G https://amzn.to/3aoJjsM

Other tools I use in this tutorial:

Clover Multi Needle Tool (holds 1 – 3 needles) – helps to speed up your felting: https://amzn.to/3amZ3w8

Beautifully designed rose gold coloured embroidery scissors https://amzn.to/3AtdJVp

Eyebrow brush (with bristle side and straight comb side) https://amzn.to/3hlde8F

How to Needle Felt Animal Spots – 4 Ways

How do I create spots on my needle felted animals?

Here is a video tutorial demonstrating how to needle felt animal spots in 4 ways.

If you are a beginner you might just want to know how to add quick easy simple spots to start with to get a feel for your needles and wool.

Or you might be looking at how you can add more realistic felted fur on your spotted animal.

I also show you how a reverse felting needle can be useful to pull the wool fibres from your core base through your top layer of wool to form a spot.

Whether you are an absolute beginner or a more advanced learner, I hope you find these tips helpful on your needle felting journey. My aim is to teach you how to needle felt animals that are detailed and realistic.

Here are the time stamps to help you find the sections you may be looking for:

0:00 Intro to animal spots

1:47 Adding simple spots – this is great for beginners, a quick easy spot

5:35 Reverse felted spots – using a reverse felting needle to create spots

7:44 Long Layered spots – how to felt realistic fur on your spotted animal

15:31 Parallel planted spots – for fur that stands up (medium/short fur animals

So here is the video. I hope you enjoy it 🙂

What is your favourite spotted animal? There are so many to amazing animals out there to choose from but please let me know in the comments – I’d love to know.

NEEDLE FELTING TOOLS AND WOOLS:

****** Best NEEDLES I use for quality are from Heidifeathers. They all come colour coded so you’ll never forget which needle you are working with.

It’s well worth getting a set of 30 Mixed Felting Needles – Triangular, Star, Reverse and Twisted Needles – here

Or you can choose them by needle type:

Star 38G – here

Triangle 38G – here

Triangle 40G – here

Twisted 38G – here

Twisted 40G – here

Twisted Mix – 38 & 40 gauge Twisted needles – here

Reverse / Inverted Felting Needles – here

****** NEEDLE HOLDERS ******

Clover Multi Needle Tool which holds 1 to 3 needles and really helps to speed up your felting: here

Have your 5 favourite needles in holders- 5 x Long Wooden Needle Felting Handle – keep as they are or decorate them? here

****** SCISSORS ******

Beautifully designed rose gold embroidery scissors – handy small size, sharp for cutting strands of wool for long furred animals and for trimming stray fibres –here

****** WOOL ******

Heidifeathers provides a wonderful variety of quality wools.

CARDED Wools – quick and easy to felt with Carded wool batts bundle of 4 natural wool shades; white, grey, dark brown and mid brown here

Carded wool batts, Carded Jacob Wool batts In Natural Shades here

White Corriedale Wool Slither (300g) here

‘Creature Mix’ Carded Wool Slivers HF – 6 wonderful animal shades of needle felting carded wool slivers, here

Or buy individual colours Heidifeathers Single colour Slivers, Natural sheep or alpaca wool tops – choose from a variety of animal colors and bright colours too here

Merino TOPS selection: Heidifeathers Merino Wool Tops Toy Box Mix (animal colours – 12 – total 300g) – here

PERFECT COLOUR PACKS for when you want to add fur to a particular animal – Merino Wool Tops :

Pack of 6 ‘Beautiful Browns’ here – donkey, mouse, tawny owl, mole, hare.

Pack of 6 ‘Grand greys’ here badger, koala, grey squirrel

Pack of 6 ‘Outstanding Oranges and Yellows’ here fox, red squirrel, autumn leaves, bumble bee, yellow chicks, orangutan

Pack of 6 ‘Gleeful Greens’ – here leaves, lizards and frogs, parrots

(Please see links disclaimer in the right hand panel)

My Top 15 NEEDLE FELTING TOOLS & MATERIALS [& How to use them Explained]

So you’ve got your felting base, some needles and some wool, BUT what about a wooden letter opener? or some hair straighteners? ..(huh? I might hear you say..)

The video below walks you through my top 15 favourite Needle Felting Tools and Materials and I explain how I use each of them to create detailed and realistic animals. These take you beyond the beginner basics so if you are looking for the best felting equipment to advance your skills then I hope this list will help.

I include felting tools (like needles and their holders, scissors and my favourite felting mat) as well as materials like wire, clay and wax. There are some supplies you may not have thought of so I hope to inspire you.

My demonstrations feature a range of felted animals such as my sparrow, cat, dog, bumble bee, hare, bunny and more.

I hope you enjoy it 🙂 Let me know which was your favourite?

I’ve included the links on where to find the supplies below the video too.

======================================

Here is more info about the Mr Bumbley Bee PDF Tutorial.

Here is the Earth Mat full written review.

Here are the UK links to some of the tools and materials I mention:

*** NEEDLES – Best for quality are from Heidifeathers

Well worth getting a set of 30 Mixed Felting Needles – 10 Colour Coded Different types – Triangular, Star, Reverse and Twisted Needles here

Or you can get them by needle type:

– 38G Star Needle -10 needles here

– 38 & 40G Twisted Needles – 5 of Each Needle here

– 10 Reverse / Inverted Felting Needles here

*** NEEDLE HOLDERS

Keep your favourite felting needles in holders

– Heidifeathers 5 x Long Wooden Needle Felting Handle – decorate them? here

– Peacock patterned needle holder (they have a variety of gorgeous colours) here

– Clover Multi Needle Tool which holds 1 to 3 needles: here

– Heidifeathers Wooden Multi Needle Tool (holds 4 needles): here

*** EARTH MAT here

*** WOODEN LETTER OPENER here

*** KNITTING NEEDLES

This bamboo set is a budget way to have a range of sizes to choose from (18 Sizes from 2.0mm to 10.0mm) here

*** WIRE & PIPE CLEANERS

Hamilworth – Paper Covered Wires – White 22 Gauge – 25 Per Pack – here

1mm armature wire x 30m – here

2mm PVC Coated Garden Wire Coil, Green x 30m – here

100 Pipe Cleaners 29cm x 6mm Brown, White, Black, Flesh and Grey – here

Just black – x50 – here

Just white – x100 – here

*** Flat nosed PLIERS:

Draper Flat Nose Mini Pliers with Soft Grip, 115mm – here

*** STRAIGHTENERS

I would go for this more budget version of the ones I have if buying some just for needle felting, very similar to mine in what they can do but less pricey – Remington Ceramic Straight 230 Hair Straighteners, 15 Seconds Heat Up Time with Variable Temperature Setting – here

*** SCISSORS

Professional Thinning Shears Hair Cutting Teeth Scissors – here

Professional Hairdressing Scissors – here

Nail Scissors – here

*** AIR DRY CLAY

Set of 6 Skin Colours Silk Clay Pots – here

*** BEESWAX BALM here

(For the Amazon affiliate links I may receive a small commission at no extra cost to you. This supports my art and enables me to continue to provide valuable content and for that I am so very grateful to you – Thank you!!)

Needle felted Fox

I so love foxes. For many they are a real pest and I can understand how heart breaking it can be for a fox to take a beloved chicken (we live with 3 beautiful chickens and are often on fox watch!). However I will never stop being amazed at how in the UK we actually have wild dogs (almost mini wolves) roaming around. Not only that, they are a vibrant orange colour that matches the autumn leaves! I don’t know about you but I think they are stunning animals!!

Back in September I was so delighted to receive a commission from a lovely lady in California to needle felt a curled up fox. My second ever felted animal was a fox but I have learned so much since then and couldn’t wait to get started.

This photo of a beautiful real fox was my inspiration.

Fox fur is far from being one colour but a mix of brown, cream, yellow and orange tones which are accentuated by black and white. I love to make my wool sculptures as realistic as possible so I chose and hand blended a lovely colour palette in merino and corriedale wools.

I started off with a wire armature and wrapped corriedale wool over it using fox anatomy and skeletal pictures on line for reference. I then shaped the head, added the ears, eyes and nose and then added the paw pads to the feet. Then, using the long fur technique, I attached the foxy coat. I used black horse hair for the whiskers!

I hope you like this sweet little fox. Here are some photos of the finished sculpture. Such a bushy tail 🙂

Perfect autumnal (fall) setting for this little needle felted fox made by its new owner in California. Can you spot the fox? 🙂

Blossom the baby bunny

My first ever needle felted animal back in 2013 was a sweet little white bunny holding a carrot.

He seemed to just emerge out of my wool the moment I started stabbing away and sculpting with my barbed needles! From that day I just knew this was the hobby for me!

It has been a journey of joy in creating, therapy and relaxation through the tough trials that life brings and through my own experimentation it has hopefully helped others as I journal and share my techniques as tutorials.

Needle felting is such a wonderful art form as it enables you to just go for it with whatever you want to make, with no need for a pattern or sewing, just your passion and imagination. If you make a mistake it doesn’t matter – it is forgiving and each time you create something new the result brings a smile!

As some of you have come to know, I love to improve and challenge myself. This last few weeks I set myself a challenge to make an animal with fur that has been reverse needle felted. At the moment we are staying in a lovely house in the countryside next to open fields of corn and wild flowers and we often see the cutest bunnies popping up from their burrows and skipping and playing in the sunlight. They are a delight to watch, especially when they hop away with only a flash of a white fluffy tail to be seen.

So what better animal to choose to have fluffy fur than a cute baby bunny rabbit! To me they are a real sign that spring has arrived and summer is on its way!

I would like to introduce you to ‘Blossom’!

You can see from the photos that she is the perfect size to sit on your hand just like a real baby rabbit. She is 15cm tall from the top of her head down to her cute bunny paws.

As with all my needle felted animals, it took many hours of hard work and love to give her that playful character. Her core is made of undyed mixed rare breed sheep’s wool from Scotland. Her beautiful soft fluffy fur is a blend of merino sheep’s wool (non-mulesed) from South Africa. Her nose and eyes are made of wool too, so no glass or plastic. Her whiskers are made from Shetland pony horse tail hair.

She even has pink paw pad detail when you look underneath her!…and look at that fluffy tail! 🙂 aw!!

Here you can see that I made the front and back feet individually and left a tuft of core wool on each for easy attachment.

You might be wondering what reverse needle felting is?

Firstly I used normal barbed felting needles to sculpt her shape with the core wool and add the colour with the merino wool. Once I had added a layer of white merino wool over her body I then added a layer of ‘pewter’ (dark grey) merino wool. I then took a reverse needle (which has barbs going the opposite way to a normal barbed needle) and as I stabbed at the wool it pulled the white wool fibres (and some of the core wool) through the grey. This resulted in a fluffy light grey colour. I carefully used an eye brow brush to brush the fibres in one direction to mimic the look of baby bunny fur.

She is ready to hop into your life this spring time!

Feel free to comment and let me know what you think and if you have any questions about reverse needle felting.

I hope you have a lovely relaxing Easter!!

Poppy

Poppy

Just finished needle felting a beautiful black and white dog called Poppy.  I wanted to capture the smiley faced playful character of the real dog Poppy who loves to fetch a ball, go for a swim and have lots of fun on her walks, sometimes with legs splashed with mud!

I am not sure what breed she is but she looks like a spaniel/collie cross.

She was a delight to make. She is made from core wool over wire and then merino wool layered over the top. Her eyes, nose and even her tiny collar with a paw print disc is made from wool. Her layers of long fur were added with my usual technique (click here for tutorial).

Once needle felted I was able to pose her with head slightly tilted, front leg bent and tail ready to wag……

Don’t you think she looks happy to be finished? 🙂

Little by little (a custom needle felted guinea pig)

Little by little  (a custom needle felted guinea pig)

Do you ever feel like you just don’t have the time to needle felt? Feel envious of those amazing artists who produce several sculptures a week whilst you work hard at your full time job and dream you could be stabbing some wool but then feel too tired when you finally get home?

Well you are not alone! …I really haven’t had much time at all recently. In fact I have felt so frustrated about it and have had to remind myself that I am not in a competition but this is my hobby and my style and my time.

This month I have proved to myself that you can still take just a tiniest bit of time out to have a little stab here and there even with a full time job …and guess what ? little by little you start to make some progress and when those deep brown eyes from that newly needle felted animal are staring back at you, you soon realise you have managed to create something quite wonderful and all that effort and time passing by has been worthwhile!! 🙂

Of course seeing that end result is very satisfying but it’s time to enjoy the journey too (no matter how long it takes) !!

So, the dark eyes staring back at me? Well they would be from the little guinea pig I just finished for a very doting guinea pig lover in Warrington in memory of her precious loved guinea pig.

This sweetie pie has taken me a while but I got there in the end!…. phew…. Hope you like her.:-)

Guinea pig (8) Guinea pig (11) Guinea pig (13) Guinea pig (16) Guinea pig (17) Guinea pig (25) Guinea pig (26) Guinea pig (27) Guinea pig (28) Guinea pig (29) Guinea pig (33) Guinea pig (36) Guinea pig (37) Guinea pig (39) Guinea pig (40) Guinea pig (41) Guinea pig (42) Guinea pig (43)

How to needle felt animal eyes

“So, I just about know how to needle felt a cute fluffy animal but how do I even start to needle felt its eyes? How can I make the eyes look 3D, shiny and realistic and not too cartoon-like?’, I could use glass or plastic eyes but would love to use wool so that my sculpture is totally needle felted- so what do I do?”

This photo tutorial will hopefully show you the basics of needle felting animal eyes and give you some ideas along the way too.

Adding the eyes to any needle felted piece is actually one of my favourite parts. It brings the animal to life and gives it its soulful character. Getting the eyes just right shouldn’t be a stress! it can take some practice but it can be so rewarding adding that final detail to your newly created animal…

Here are some of the eyes I have needle felted so far to give you some ideas.

1-eye collage

Can you work out what animals they are?

So here is how you can get started…

Step 1: Look at photos of eyes and get to know basic eye anatomy

Of course eyes are different for every species so the first thing to do is to take a look at photos of real animals to see how big the eyes are in proportion to the animal’s head, decide on colour, the shape, note where the light reflects etc. You don’t want to make the wrong sort of eyes for your animal (eg a cat’s eye on a mouse for example). I usually just do a web search and bookmark the pictures or pin them on pinterest to refer to whilst I needle felt.

Remember doing biology? well you don’t need to know full anatomy of the eye but knowing your basic parts does help. Here is an eye of a needle felted hare I made;

eye anatomy

You will find that most animals will have a pupil which can change in size depending on mood/ light exposure. For some it will be round or it can be different in shape e.g. a slit for cats and reptiles, square for a goat, even w-shaped in a cuttlefish!! Some have a distinctly coloured iris, some have eye lids some don’t- birds’ eyes face forward rather than sit on the side of the head… aren’t animals remarkable!

Step 2: Go for it

For demonstration purposes I will show you the stages that took place when making eyes for a mouse and then a badger. Eyes can be added early on or at the end, it’s completely up to you. I sometimes like to do mine near the end and when finished I can’t help but smile! 🙂

Some ‘Fit to be loved’ eye felting tips

  • use fine high gauge barbed needles for detail such as 40G or 42G
  • use warm hands to roll the tiny eye ball to keep rounded/oval rather than stabbing too much as this will just flatten it
  • it is easier to layer eyes parts on top of each other rather than try to make the exact shape (see what I mean below)
  • do each stage for each eye at the same time to get the eyes the same
  • measure using string/thread/fingers to check eyes are of equal size and symmetrically positioned
  • to attach eye to the head stab mainly around the edge of the eye in various directions rather than across the middle to keep the eye plump and prevent it from going too flat.

See below for instructions on the mouse and badger eyes. Note that I have also now created detailed videos on dog eyes and cat eyes if you would like to see those 🙂

Mouse eyes (-basic level)

  • roll in warm hands 2 equal sized rugby ball shaped balls of black wool to form the basic eye shape. Lightly needle felt in different directions then place on the mouse head viewing from the top to check the positioning is symmetrical. The eyes on this mouse are simple to view as they contrast well in colour with the rest of its face fur.
19-mouse eye2
  • firmly felt the wool into place by stabbing around the edge of the shape to keep the eye plump and not completely flat
18-mouse eye1
  • use a smaller amount of wool for each of the eye irises (using a grey/green colour) and again stab them into place, being careful not to flatten the eye too much…
17-mouse eye4
  • add a tiny ball of the black to the top of the iris to form the pupil. The position of the pupil will determine the way the mouse looks at you; for this little mouse the pupil at the top gives the impression that he is looking up. Ensure the pupils match in size and position on each eye (you don’t want him to look cross-eyed unless that is the expression you are after..)
02-mouse eye6
  • adding the pupil in this way i.e. layering one circular shape over another is far easier and less tedious than attempting to shape the iris in a half moon shape and also gives the eye a fuller shape..
03-mouse eye7
  • take a thin strip of cream-coloured wool to form the edge of the mouse’s eyelids (top and bottom) which nicely frame the eyes. View the eyes from the top to ensure they are in the correct position and of correct thickness
04-mouse eye9
05-mouse eye14
06-mouse eye11
07-mouse eye10
  • this is also a good time to manipulate the wool on the eyes as well as around the eyes with your fingers to make the shape of the eyes fit the face as best it can. For example you could pull in the bottom corners of the eyes and narrow the bridge of the nose slightly if you choose to do so or if one eye sticks out more than the other you can carefully push it in slightly.
08-mouse eye13
09-mouse eye12
  • as a finishing touch and to bring the eyes to life and make them look 3D and shiny, add a tiny dot of white to give the illusion that light is reflecting across the eye surface. The exact position of this is not so crucial as getting them in the same mirrored position for each eye…
10-mouse eye15
11-mouse eye18
13-mouse eye17
14-mouse eye16

Here is the finished mouse saying ‘I love you’ with it’s cute yellow felted flower…

needle felt eyes20

Badger eyes (- intermediate level)

The badger’s eyes are slightly harder to create. The reason being is that the badger’s dark eyes are hard to see on a fairly dark face so needing more careful measuring to ensure both eyes look the same. The eyes are mainly dark so need more help in making the surface look like it is shiny and reflecting the light. I also add colour to the bottom corner of each eye to form what is known as the ‘lacrimal caruncle’ that you sometimes see in mammals such as a badger (to make it look even more life like)

  • roll 2 small balls of black wool in warm hands and needle felt lightly in all directions
03-badger eye (9)
  • add the balls to the badger head, felting slightly to keep in place but don’t felt firmly until you have checked they are positioned correctly
04-badger eye (10)
  • whilst they are roughly in place view the eyes from above to check the position. As the background fur is very dark too, you may find this hard to do so you may wish to feel the eyes too to check this..as you can see the left eye was slightly higher at this stage so I moved the eye down slightly to match..
05-badger eye (12)
  • once happy with the positioning, felt around the edge of each shape, not across its middle, to ensure the eye does not become too flat.
06-badger eye (13)
  • take a thin length of grey wool for the top and bottom eyelid edges for each eye, these will nicely frame the eyes.
07-badger eye (14)
  • needle felt these into place and then view both eyes from the top to ensure they are in the correct position and of correct thickness
08-badger eye (15)
14-badger eye (6)
  • add a tiny amount of brown wool into the inner eye corners (the ‘lacrimal caruncle’) – this was the same colour as the brown detail on the badger nose
15-badger eye (11)
17-badger eye (4)
  • the eyes of the badger are very dark so as well as having a tiny white spot to give the illusion of a shiny eye as with the mouse, I wanted to add some grey to the sides of each black eye for extra 3D light reflecting effect.
16-badger eye (2)
  • it is very important to ensure that what you do with one eye is mirrored with the other so checking from all angles is crucial.
11-badger eye (18)
  • and add the white dot…
12-badger eye (1)
13-badger eye (19)

Yes these eyes can take a while to get just right but oh how cute do these badgers look when finished!!

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Did you find this tutorial helpful? What would you like to learn about next? Please leave comments. Why not post a photo of your own creations?

For more tutorials like this please visit my Tutorials, tips and ideas page.

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Don’t have time to make one but would love a one of a kind needle felted animal by Fit to be loved for yourself or for that special someone? Visit my Etsy shop today to see my latest creations. Or like my facebook page to see what I am making next.

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