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Author Archives: Amanda Adebisi

Little by little (a custom needle felted guinea pig)

Little by little  (a custom needle felted guinea pig)

Do you ever feel like you just don’t have the time to needle felt? Feel envious of those amazing artists who produce several sculptures a week whilst you work hard at your full time job and dream you could be stabbing some wool but then feel too tired when you finally get home?

Well you are not alone! …I really haven’t had much time at all recently. In fact I have felt so frustrated about it and have had to remind myself that I am not in a competition but this is my hobby and my style and my time.

This month I have proved to myself that you can still take just a tiniest bit of time out to have a little stab here and there even with a full time job …and guess what ? little by little you start to make some progress and when those deep brown eyes from that newly needle felted animal are staring back at you, you soon realise you have managed to create something quite wonderful and all that effort and time passing by has been worthwhile!! 🙂

Of course seeing that end result is very satisfying but it’s time to enjoy the journey too (no matter how long it takes) !!

So, the dark eyes staring back at me? Well they would be from the little guinea pig I just finished for a very doting guinea pig lover in Warrington in memory of her precious loved guinea pig.

This sweetie pie has taken me a while but I got there in the end!…. phew…. Hope you like her.:-)

Guinea pig (8) Guinea pig (11) Guinea pig (13) Guinea pig (16) Guinea pig (17) Guinea pig (25) Guinea pig (26) Guinea pig (27) Guinea pig (28) Guinea pig (29) Guinea pig (33) Guinea pig (36) Guinea pig (37) Guinea pig (39) Guinea pig (40) Guinea pig (41) Guinea pig (42) Guinea pig (43)

Needle felted Mole

Needle felted Mole

The past few weekends I have been making my latest British mammal, a mole!! He is a one of kind commission and will be going to his forever home very soon.

He has corriedale and alpaca wool for his core, then layers of velvety textured fur made from luscious chocolate merino wool mixed with brown corriedale wool. To get this effect I attached the wool in strands (see my tutorial here on needle felting long fur) but then cut it really short to give that mole fur look. I can’t help but feel how soft he is. 🙂 I chose pinks and creams for his nose, mouth and feet. He has wire in his toes and tail for that bit of pose-ability. He has tiny black felted eyes and his whiskers are made of horse hair..

I hope you like him. I gave him that ‘Fit to be loved’ cheeky smile!

08-Needle felted mole (11) 27-Needle felted mole (26)

10-Needle felted mole (13) 09-Needle felted mole (12)

22-Needle felted mole (23) 14-Needle felted mole (17)

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13-Needle felted mole (16)  15-Needle felted mole (18)

17-Needle felted mole (20)  19-Needle felted mole (1)

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25-Needle felted mole (3)           12-Needle felted mole (15)

21-Needle felted mole (22)   24-Needle felted mole (2)

02-Needle felted mole (5)  03-Needle felted mole (6)

 

Needle felting a Tawny Owl – photo tutorial

Needle felting a Tawny Owl – photo tutorial

Thinking of needle felting an owl and need some ideas on where to start? Not sure how to make a feather effect from wool? 

This was one of my most challenging project , but also extremely enjoyable and rewarding! Owls are beautiful birds with so much character and you can really express this in your sculpture, so I encourage you to get stabbing and have a go!

So why did I choose to make an owl? Well to be honest an owl was on my to do list for ages as I am a big fan of owls but it just so happened that the Manager at ‘Found’ (my favourite charity shop in Harrow which supports the needs of the local community) asked me if I could make an owl to overlook their new library. Of course I flew at the chance!!

But why a tawny owl? I noticed a number of gorgeous needle felted barn owls out there (which I will likely make at some point) but hardly any tawny owls and for me the tawny is an iconic woodland owl from the story books (remember the owls in Winnie the Pooh and The animals of Farthing wood?) This owl looks very wise but has the cutest expression, plump rounded body when its feathers are fluffed up and I just love the medley of browns and creams in its colouring! Such an owl would be perfect at the library!

Wow from photos of real tawny owls they look so detailed – where do I begin? Yes it can look daunting when you first look at the feathered detail. Even if you felted a single feather every day for the next year you would probably never finish it so the idea is to show detail with lots of layers but still keep it fairly simple. It will take some hours and this is probably not a project for you to start with if you have no felting experience at all but if you do want a challenge then go for it!

By making one section at a time – starting from the core wool base shape and then adding facial features, then tummy feathers, wings, then tail, then head feathers and talons to finish- you too can sculpt an owl of your very own.

As with most of my creations I took some photos along the way to show you the various stages and a few techniques to give you that inspiration you need. Please do contact me if you are unsure of how I did something! Also you may find my other tutorials useful.

What will I need? 

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Felted owl (100)

  • Somewhere to work- most of the time this is indoors for me but on the odd occasion I manage to work outside in my garden 🙂 just make sure your back is supported!
  • Foam pad or felting brush (so not to stab yourself and to provide a firm base to work on)
  • Barbed needles of various sizes; thicker for initial shaping and finer for detail
  • A needle holder; this is optional but for making basic shapes it saves time to use 2 or 3 needles at the same time. In the pictures you will see I used the 3 needle holder pen by Clover.
  • Wool to felt with; I used natural corriedale wool to make the core of my owl as I find it felts quickly and ends up nice and firm. I then used merino wools over the top for feathers as they are soft and come in some lovely colours. I buy my wools at a very good price from World of Wool.
  • Small pair of scissors to cut lengths of wool for feather making, plus also to trim any loose strands to finish off.
  • Pipe cleaners (I used two 30cm length cotton coated) on which to wrap wool over for the talons
  • A small pair of pliers to twist wire ‘claws’ into shape
  • Photos or art work of tawny owls, some time, some love and lots of imagination!!

1) Building the core; head and abdomen

As with most projects where I don’t use a wire armature, the owl will start off as basic shapes made from core wool;

  • Start off by needle felting two basic shapes to a medium firm consistency using your thicker needles(use the clover pen tool if you find it easier); you will need one round ball (with a flat side for the face) and an oval shape (as in above photo) for the abdomen. Join these two shapes together. If needle felting is new to you, you may wish to look at my other tutorials for some felting basics and attaching body parts.
  • Sculpt a typical owl heart shape face by adding small pieces of wool and concentrate your stabbing to hollow out two disc shaped cheeks within which the eyes will go. Emphasise the brow line and the centre where its beak will go and form a ridge around the cheeks.
  • Add more wool to the abdomen to enhance its cute rounded owl chest.

Felted owl (1)

2) Facial features

Refer to the photos and annotated picture below…

Felted owl (4)  Felted owl (5)

2-face anatomy

  • For the beak; roll a small piece of merino wool in your palms and felt firmly on your foam pad/brush leaving one end softer (soft end is to attach the beak to the face) and the other end felted to a point (owls have a curved beak). Attach the beak to the face.(NB read this whole tutorial before starting – you will see what I mean later on)
  • Next add two blobs of dark wool as a guide to where the eyes will be located (the eyes will be finished off once the rest of the face is finished.
  • Add some dark brown wool to follow the ridge around the cheeks.
  • Layer some beautiful warm and light browns to form the owl’s cheeks; each piece radiates out from the eyes. the same colours are also used for the forehead but with some darker wool overlaying it.
  • For the bristles on the inside of the eye, around the beak and up to the brow; use tiny cut pieces of cream/white wool fixed well at the base.
  • Felt the eyes (see tutorial about eyes here); in the photos above you can see the right eye is complete and the left is under construction 🙂 I made a dark brown iris with black pupil and white dot to mimic where light would reflect. The eyes are lined with a cream wool and I stabbed an area above the eye to shape the eye lids. 

3) Building up the tummy feathers

For the basics of how to add longer lengths of wool to your sculpture I suggest you first take a look at my tutorial on how to felt long fur here, as although there will be some variation in making feathers, I will be using the same techniques throughout to ensure the wool is firmly secure.

  • With your scissors cut strips of wool in preparation – I used a variety  of creams and browns.

Felted owl (8)

  • Start from the bottom and work your way up in layers, fixing each piece securely.

Felted owl (9)  Felted owl (10)  Felted owl (13)

  • The difference between an animal fur look (like with my badger, fox or squirrel) and a feathery look for your owl is that for the feathery look each piece should be defined and not overly blended into the neighbouring pieces. To achieve this the base of each section fixed to the core should be narrower,  don’t line the pieces up in a straight line but stagger them randomly and for some sections cut the ends at an angle or in a ‘V’ shape!
  • The main overall look is cream for the bottom half and rich warm browns (matching the cheeks) for the top half. Then add some more cream at the top near the neck.

Felted owl (12)  Felted owl (14)

Felted owl (17)

  • Add some thin strips of dark brown for extra flecks to finish this section off.

Felted owl (18)      Felted owl (19)

” OH the beak has changed!!” Yes I decided that a lighter and slightly longer beak would look better! One of the wonders of needle felting is that you can change things part way through- careful though as chopping off parts is not the best thing!

I also added some white to define the forehead.

4) Wing feathers

I chose to felt the wings for my owl in a fixed closed position with feathers laying close to the body rather than the wings being spread open. So I looked at lots of pictures of wing anatomy to see which feathers would show and how they should be positioned. I have included an annotated picture of my owl from the side to illustrate the various wing parts we will tackle next. To make layering easier we will start with the primary, then do the secondary, and finish off with an overlay of feathery wing coverts.

1-anatomy

It is up to you how many of the feathers you make; I made 4 primary and 5 secondary feathers for each wing.

a) Primary feathers 

  • Flat felt each piece into shape. I used the clover pen tool for faster felting. To keep straight edges I traced an outline onto the wool with two needles in my clover pen and then folded the wool over to the middle and felted well on both sides. Make sure you felt at an angle along the edges to keep them smooth and well shaped. My tutorial on making bunny ears (second part of step 6) may help get this technique right.

Felted owl (21) Felted owl (22)

Felted owl (23)

  • Make each piece roughly the same width but gradually getting longer in length. You can see the longest and shortest together in this picture below. The ends should taper to a curve. The fibres at the other end should remain fluffy and loose to be fixed to your owl’s body later on.

Felted owl (24)

  • Ensure the pieces match the sizes of the pieces on the opposite wing. To help do this lay your piece on top of the wool and score around the edge with two needles in the clover pen.

Felted owl (25) Felted owl (26)

Felted owl (27) Felted owl (28)

  • Remove the piece and you will see an outline. Again fold the edges over and felt until you get a rough replica..

Felted owl (29) Felted owl (30)

  • When attaching these feathers later on they will end up positioned a bit like a concertina fan; you can test how they will look together at this point (see right photo)

Felted owl (53)  Felted owl (37)

  • On each feather felt alternate layers of the light and dark browns starting from the tip

Felted owl (55)  Felted owl (54)

  • Define a central line along the length of each feather by turning the feather over and felting deeply along the centre so that the core wool goes through to the other side. Then needle it down flat.

Felted owl (60)  Felted owl (61)

Felted owl (62)  Felted owl (56)

b) Secondary feathers 

  •  Make 5 pieces for each wing, each getting slightly wider and longer each time. These pieces should be shorter than the primary feathers (roughly half the length). This time make the ends more rounded rather than tapering to a point.

Felted owl (31) Felted owl (32)  Felted owl (52)

One edge will be felted to the next feather with smallest at the top (see left photo).

You can see that they look quite big compared to your owl at this stage. Once on the owl though they will felt into position (fluffy ends will felt into the body) and you will want the owl to be 3D not a flattened piece so the wings will protrude outwards.

Felted owl (51)

  • Felt some colour on to the edge that will be seen (I am demonstrating how this is done for the left wing). I used a base of the lighter brown and added band of darker brown. If you have time you can felt layers like you did with the primary feathers ((in hind sight I would have preferred to have done this as the finished effect looks more feather-like but decided to try out an alternative method).

Felted owl (50)

Felted owl (49)

  • Felt the pieces together by stabbing all the way along the edge.
  • Continue to add as much detail into the feathers as you like; I added a tiny strip of cream underneath the dark brown bands and a line down the centre of the top feather.

Felted owl (46)   Felted owl (47)

Here you can see the feathers all layed out for what will be the right wing.

Felted owl (57)

  • Trim the fluffy ends so they are of equal length, then turn over and pull down some of the strands so they stand out at the back of the feathers ready to felt to your owl.

Felted owl (45) Felted owl (44)

It doesn’t matter about how messy the back of the feathers ends up as you won’t see this side once fixed to the owl. 🙂

c) Attaching the primary and secondary feathers

  • Starting with the primary feathers, fix each feather at the base (longest at the outer edge nearest to tummy, sshortest toward what would be the back bone). Attach each feather over the previous as per the photo earlier that showed the feathers as a concertina fan.
  • Then attach the secondary feather section over the primary feathers where the shoulder blade would be.
  • For help with attaching body parts see my tutorial here.

Felted owl (38) Felted owl (40)

Felted owl (59) Felted owl (63)

  • Attach the right wing in the same way using the left as a guide to ensure you fix the feathers symmetrically (mirroring the opposite side)

d) Wing Coverts 

You could now felt even more individual feathers but to give the illusion of small feathers I simply added more tufts of wool much like with the tummy feathers.

  • Cut and fix small pieces starting from the bottom (just at the top of the secondary feathers) and working in layers towards the neck. The bottom row should overhang the secondary feathers. Try to keep the overall shape as a ‘V’. I also added a few random white tufts which you will see if you look at pictures of real tawny owls.
  • Add a fine strip of dark brown wool along the centre of each of brown wool pieces.

Felted owl (42)    Felted owl (64)

Felted owl (65)  Felted owl (67)

Felted owl (69)  Felted owl (71)

5) Tail

  • Felt a larger feather for the tail in much the same way as you layered the colours for the primary feathers. The tail should be roughly twice the width of the primary feathers but with a rounded end.
  • Optional –  add more light brown over the top of the banded pattern to make a slightly mottled effect.

Felted owl (72)

Felted owl (73)

  • Attach the tail firmly to the owl, then add some light brown wool around the base so you can’t see any of the core wool showing.
  • You may find you need to squeeze the two wings into the centre to mould to the shape you need them to be in. .

Felted owl (74) Felted owl (75)

Felted owl (77) Felted owl (78) Felted owl (79)

6) Head Feathers

  • Alternating various shades of light browns, layer tiny pieces of wool from the back of the head up towards the face.
  •  Use the annotated picture as a guide- the feathers should follow the red lines which radiate from the back of the head to the cheek ridges. I found that it helped to felt the centre line first.    

1-head guide 1 2-Head feather guide 2

Felted owl (81)   Felted owl (82)

  • To give a feather look – twizzle the ends with your fingers as you go.

Felted owl (83) Felted owl (84) Felted owl (85)

Felted owl (86)   Felted owl (98)

  • Add thin flecks of dark brown wool randomly to finish as seen above (bottom right) and below.

Felted owl (88)  Felted owl (90)

Felted owl (92)     Felted owl (97)

Take a moment to say ‘squee!!’ Well done you are almost there!

Felted owl (96)

Felted owl (95)

7) Talons

Owls have four toes on each foot and when standing on a flat surface three will usually be at the front and one at the back but when clinging onto a branch they have the amazing ability for one toe to move to the back. So you will need to decide on how your owl will sit. My owl is to be sat perched on some wood with its tail and primary feathers hanging down so I will position the toes with two at the front and two at the back for each foot.

There are many ways to make talons but I will show how to make simple talons from just two cotton coated pipe-cleaners (one for each foot) and wool. Bare wire (kept blunt – don’t worry) will form the claws.

Fold a pipe-cleaner in half then in half again in quarters. The bends will serve as a guide to where the next fold will take place.

owl (1)   owl (3)

Straighten out the piece slightly (you will still see the bends from where you folded) Starting at one end, fold the end up to your first quarter bend. Once folded twist the segment along its length.

owl (4) owl (5)

Then pull the remaining pipe-cleaner at the next bend towards your previous quarter. Think of it a bit like how you may make a flower with four petals.. twisting as you go…

owl (6) owl (7)

owl (8)

Continue with your other quarters, bending towards the middle…and twisting the middle too to make a crisscross shape (looks like a kiss?or perhaps an x chromosome? 🙂 )

owl (9)  owl (10)

Then do the other foot in the same way.

owl (12)  owl (11)

If you wanted 3 toes at the front you can easily make this shape at this stage too.

owl (54)

You can keep the toes as they are or define the claws. To do this cut the bend on each toe so that the ends become two pieces. Then pluck away the pipe cleaner material to reveal bare wire. Mind your fingers as these can be sharp!

owl (13) owl (22)

Then using pliers, twist the two wires together and bend the end(so not sharp to touch)

owl (21) owl (19)

This will take a little while, but do this on all toes. Trim the cotton on the pipe-cleaners to make a nice shape. You can see they are now looking more like owl talons..

owl (18)  owl (16)

owl (23)  owl (24)

For skinny toes you could leave these as they are but for this owl I wanted to pad them out a bit. 

Take a thin length of merino wool and wrap from the middle of each the foot out to each toe and back to the center again. You may need several of these lengths. Watch that your wool doesn’t get stuck over the claw. Each toe should taper to a thinner end near to the claw and be bulkier in the middle of the toe and towards the main foot. Achieve this by wrapping only once near to the claw and twice round for the rest of the toe. The tighter you wrap the less felting will be needed.

owl (26) owl (51) owl (49)

Secure the wool into place all over and sculpt into shape with a fine needle taking care not to break the needle by hitting the wire. Once felted, bend the foot into shape.

owl (28)   owl (50)   owl (29)

owl (48) owl (30)

Add a slightly darker shade of wool (I used a mink colour) to the underneath of the foot.

owl (31)

Scrunch a small handful of wool and felt onto the top of each foot (this will be used to anchor the foot onto the owl’s body. Then thicken up the foot around this with some more wool to make the foot look fluffy.

owl (32)

owl (46)

owl (33) owl (35)

Use a thicker stronger needle to fix your feet to your owl. Felt deep into the owl at all angles until well secure.

owl (45) owl (44)

owl (43) owl (42)

To finish off I added a few layers of wool feathers in the cream and mink round the feet 🙂

owl (41) owl (36)

After a bit of tidying up and a trip to the park…….:-)

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27-IMG_4262  10-IMG_4235

It was so lovely to see this little owl meet his new owner in his forever home at the charity shop library!!

Owl (3) Owl (6)

Did you find this tutorial helpful? What would you like to learn about next? Please leave comments. Why not post a photo of your own creations?

For more tutorials like this please visit my Tutorials, tips and ideas page.

Don’t ever miss out on my latest tutorials! Insert your email address and click the ‘Follow’ button on the right hand panel to receive notifications of when the next post is up..:-)

Don’t have time to make one but would love a one of a kind needle felted animal by Fit to be loved for yourself or for that special someone? Visit my Etsy shop today to see my latest creations. Or like my facebook page to see what I am making next.

Felted birdie

Thinking of making a simple needle felted bird? not sure where to start or need some ideas of how to finish your creation with some extra detail?

Last week I had the pleasure of making a little needle felted bird for my sister as a birthday present. She asked me for a simple teal bird to go with her newly decorated room once it is finished but as soon as I started I couldn’t help but let my imagination take over.

I absolutely love my sister so I expressed this by forming heart shaped wings that have beautiful button and thread embellishments. I also tried to make his facial features come to life by giving him adorable eyes and a little tuft of wool on his head(much like a woodpecker or crested tit) 🙂

Last night I got to see my sister’s face as she opened up her parcel through the wonder of  ‘facetime’ on our ipads. So pleased she likes him!! I hope you like him too..

So where did I start? As you can see I twisted some cotton felt covered pipe cleaners to make a birdie shape…

Felted bird (11)

Felted bird (12)

 

 

 

 

 

 

I then wrapped lengths of core wool over the structure and needle felted until I got the right shape. (Be careful not to stab the wire in the centre of the pipe cleaners by felting along the edge of the pipe cleaner only).

Felted bird (13)Felted bird (14)Felted bird (15)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Felted bird (16)

 

 

 

 

 

 

I then used softer merino wools for the teal and blue birdie colours – light and dark shades of teal and denim blue (the beige you see under the label is for another project coming soon).

Felted bird (10)

I carefully wrapped and felted the denim blue colour wool over his legs and feet. I did the same with his beak later on. (See here for other ideas on how to felt tiny animal feet and toes).

Felted bird (17) Felted bird (18)

I chose the lighter teal wool for the underneath, face, wings and flecks of colour on the tail. I used the darker teal for the back, top of head with tuft, eye stripe and tail. I felted simple eyes in black with a white dot placed to mimic where the light would reflect and added a thin strip of white around the eyes. (see how to felt animal eyes here).

Felted bird (19) Felted bird (20)

I made the tail and wings separately before felting them on to the body (see here for how to add body parts). I chose some pearly flower shaped button which I sewed onto the wings and stitched a pattern along the length of each wing with a teal and a glittery white embroidery thread. I didn’t fully felt the wings to a perfect shape at this stage as I completed this once attached to the body..

Felted bird (21) Felted bird (22)

Once on the body I then used the denim blue wool to emphasise the shape of the heart wings by felting around the edge..

Here is the finished little teal birdie ready to send to my sister..:-)

Felted bird (32) Felted bird (27) Felted bird (25) Felted bird (24) Felted bird (23) Felted bird (9)

Felted bird (26)Felted bird (8) Felted bird (5)  Felted bird (3) Felted bird (2) Felted bird (1)

Felted bird (7)

……and of course no creation can go to is new owner without a bit of ‘fit to be loved’ wrapping..

Felted bird (31)

Don’t miss out on another post from Fit to be loved, click ‘follow’ on the right hand side of my find out more page.

How to make an Easter bunny!

Want to know how to needle felt a bunny this Easter?  How about bunny ears? … need some ideas to get started?

Hi everyone!

Now before you get too excited, sorry no I haven’t made a new bunny, but what I did want to do was bring together some pictures and links to the best of my previous bunny posts into one place for you all to enjoy this Easter! as well as offer a little Easter themed inspiration…

The other day I visited Vauxhall city farm in London (which I sometimes visit on my lunch break from managing the National Bat Helpline) and took a few snaps of a rather large bunny (I think he is part Flemish Giant)  but he looks like a wild bunny with all that browney-grey fur and as you can see he is well camouflaged too.

Easter bunny2Easter bunny

It got me thinking and I am sure you will agree that bunnies are a great sign of spring and new life at Easter and like the Vauxhall one they are extremely cute and well worth taking the time to admire. I do of course also love to eat chocolate bunnies (yum) and can’t wait to finish my Lent no chocolate diet to get my teeth into one!

So how about making a bunny this Easter?

The first time I bought some wool and attempted needle felting I ended up making this little cream bunny from corriedale wool.

Needle felted bunny needle felted bunny (8)

Then soon after I was commissioned to make a gorgeous grey bunny for a colleague who wanted to surprise his wife for her birthday. His core is corriedale and grey and pinky fur is of merino wool.

Needle felted bunny  Needle felted bunny

I loved making these bunnies. Both are laying on their backs as I think this is the sweetest lovable pose and reminds me of the bunnies (Benjamin, Snuggles and Peeps) I had the privilege to care for as a child. Unfortunately I have now developed an allergy for rabbit fur so making wool rabbits mean I still get to cuddle them without sneezing profusely.:-)

To make a bunny like these yourself this Easter why not click here to try out my needle felted bunny tutorial.

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….and for more detail on making those lovely long ears click here.

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I gave my bunnies a carrot to hold but what about keeping with the Easter theme and placing your bunny in a basket holding some needle felted eggs like the one below ?

needle felted east egg1 needle felted east egg2

or Easter flowers?

You could wrap wool round wire and needle felt the wool in place to create stems and add simple flower heads like the one I made in this tutorial.

Or why not try a sitting Easter hare??

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See here for more inspiration

Happy Easter everyone!!!!! 🙂 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Heart felt – needle felted heart tutorial for mother’s day

Heart felt – needle felted heart tutorial for mother’s day

 Are you looking for inspiration for what you can make your mum this mother’s day? this tutorial shows you how to felt a simple heart with a beautiful little flower to say how much you love her….

As this heart is actually what I have just made for my mum for Sunday I have had to ask her not to look at my blog (as she is my biggest supporter) or go on facebook until after the weekend! Sorry mum! Thankfully she is away in Norfolk until the end of the week with my dad in the caravan  so enjoying the sunshine and watching the antics of squirrels feeding from their mobile bird feeder rather than being on the computer. Of course she now knows she will be getting something felted but I think she kind of expected that anyway with having a daughter addicted to needle felting! 🙂 So when you read this mum- this one is for you!!

So today I will show you (with the help of photos I took along the way) how I made a simple heart, added a flower and the word ‘mum’. Of course this is not just limited to mothers day – you could adapt it quite easily for anyone you love 🙂

So lets get started;

You will need;

  • Barbed needles (plus needle holder if you have one as this holds more than one needle to save time when felting the heart)- use a few different sizes, thicker for main shapes, finer for details
  • Foam pad/ brush to felt onto (and prevent stabbing your knees)
  • Medium to large sized heart-shaped pastry/cookie cutter (I bought a cheap set from my local pound store with various sizes for future projects)
  • Wool roving/tops in the colours of your choice (I used soft merino wool from World of wool)
  • Beads/buttons/wool/threads/anything else you choose to decorate your piece
  • Needle and thread for attaching beads/buttons
  • Small scissors
  • Lots of love and imagination…and only a few hours of time!

Felting the heart

This is really simple to do so definitely one for beginners if you haven’t tried needle felting before.

Place the cookie cutter onto your foam pad (you will need to hold its position firmly in place throughout) and then lay lengths of wool inside. It helps with the felting process if you lay the wool in one direction and then the next layer in the other direction. 

Stab with your needle/s through the thickness of the wool to the foam to make sure you felt it firmly. Do this many times to bind the fibres together at various angles until it feels like a firm cushion.

felted heart (41)

Add more and more wool, felting each layer as you go. Ensure you felt well at the edges where the cookie cutter line is. You can add more to the middle if you wish it to be a nice plump heart 🙂 My cookie cutter was very deep so I could go on until the heart was very thick if I wanted to.

felted heart (42) felted heart (43)

Press with your fingers to feel how firm the heart is and once you are satisfied that the heart is pretty firm, you are ready to turn over to felt the other side.

Very carefully peel the heart with cutter still around it away from your foam pad and turn over. You can carry on felting at the thickness it is or add more wool, its up to you. I wanted to make a two-tone purple heart so at this point I added a lighter lilac colour to the second side.

Keep on felting until happy with the consistency and firmness, you can turn over again and felt the other side again if you wish to. NB If you want to make the heart look less holey use finer needles and shallow felt the outer layer of wool.

felted heart (44)

Removing the heart from the cutter is fairly easy providing your heart is felted firm. Use a few fingers to push the heart in place against the foam and pull the cutter up and away from it. Then gently peel the heart from the foam. And voila!

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To make the shape smooth and neaten any loose wool, you will now need to felt around the edges and felt at various angles.

felted heart (46) felted heart (45)

You can leave the heart as it is or you can sew around the edge for extra effect. Now as you can see my sewing skills are not the best (which is why I love needle felting!) but here you can see I have sewn a simple stich around the edge with a sparkly silver-white wool. NB the joy of felting is that you can felt over any knots or loose ends to finish off! I am sure your heart will look far neater than mine.

felted heart (22)  felted heart (21)

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Making and adding the flower

My mum just loves flowers (see the little mouse I made for her previously) so I wanted my heart to stand out with a flower. This is a simple design of 5 petals which you make separately and then felt together in the middle. You can then make a simple centre out of wool or (as I have done) accessorise with a shiny button or bead.

To begin then, you will need to take 5 small pieces of wool of roughly the same size (one for each petal). I will show you how to make each petal. Some of this is very similar to how I begin to make bunny ears (see here).

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Fold each piece in half and then fold in half again.

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Holding the wool piece in a loop shape as above, start stabbing across it

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Then pull the sides in and stab along the centre line, holding the bottom part which will end up being the bottom of the petal that will be fixed to the other petals so keep those fibres loose.

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Keep felting to flatten the shape but also stab the sides to keep a nice rounded petal shape. You can use your fingers to mould it as you go…

felted heart (50) felted heart (49)

Fold length ways and needle felt along the edge at various angles to make the petal really take its 3d shape

felted heart (2)

Turn the petal over to felt on the other side… keep going on both sides until it feels fairly firm and the shape you are happy with.

felted heart (1)

Do the same with all 5 petals. Then when you come to join petals together fluff up the bottom end of the petal which has been left loose and separate the fibres as below.

felted heart (7) felted heart (6)

Fit the petals together, felting the loose fibres to each other which will form the base of the centre part of the flower as you go…felt well on both the front and back..

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Once you have all petals fixed, you can then think about adding some more colour within the centre line of each petal to add depth..I chose a deep pink

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Shallow felt the deep pink detail with a fine needle (to only a few barbs deep on your needle).

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Shallow felting like this will ensure that the darker pink doesn’t show through when you turn the flower over

 felted heart (15)

Once you have added the detail, start to build up the centre of the flower. You can just keep this as a wool centre or you can embellish with a button or bead.

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 felted heart (18) felted heart (19)

I chose to add some white wool and then once I had sewn the base of my flower to the heart (just attach the centre not the petals to ensure the petals stick out nicely) I sewed on a lovely pearl button. NB you don’t necessarily have to sew the flower, you can needle felt it on if you wish, but I didn’t want to flatten the heart too much.

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 Adding a word e.g. ‘mum’

You only need to pull off a tiny bit of wool for this part. I chose a pearly white to match the pearl on the flower.

Use a fine needle to shallow felt your letters onto the heart. You can position the letters as you want them and then stab over the wool with the needle. I do this to see what it will look like but then when it comes to felting I find it becomes more freestyle, starting at one end of my tuft of wool and positioning it as I go. It is almost like you are writing with a very slow flowing ink pen even though you are frantically stabbing away at a fast pace 🙂

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So there is your heart! sweet!

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Hanging loop

How you want to display this to your mum is up to you. I thought it would be nice for my mum to be able to hang it up perhaps from a shelf, curtain tie back hook or door knob.

So I took three strands of knitting wool, one dark purple and one lilac each to match the colours of the heart and the third strand was the same glittery wool I used for the edge of my heart.

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You can simply plait the strands together or if you know how to crochet, simply crochet a foundation chain (as below) to the length you would like it.

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I tied a knot at the base of the loop. Then I attached a piece of the glittery wool to the top of the heart, threaded on a few beads, then sewed the top of the glittery wool securely to the base of the hanging loop.

felted heart (35) felted heart (39) felted heart (36)

‘Happy Mother’s day mum! I love you so much’ 🙂

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I hope you like my tutorial and it has inspired you to make something from the heart for your mum this mother’s day. If you do make the above heart, please do send me photos – I would love to see what you have made. 🙂

What would you like to learn about next? please let me know

More needle felting tutorials can be found over on my tutorials page 

Don’t ever miss out on my latest tutorials! Insert your email address and click the ‘Follow’ button on the right hand panel to receive notifications of when the next post is up..:-)

Don’t have time to make one but would love a one of a kind needle felted animal by Fit to be loved for yourself or for that special someone? Visit my Etsy shop today to see my latest creations. Or like my facebook page to see what I am making next.

 

 

Tiny feet and tiny toes – needle felt tutorial

Tiny feet and tiny toes – needle felt tutorial

How do I give my needle felted animal cute detailed feet or tiny toes?

This tutorial will hopefully inspire you with some ideas for how you might tackle felting animal feet and a step by step guide to making individual toes using wool wrapped over wire.

Basic feet

For some of my felted animal sculptures I decided not to give their feet too much detail. Here you can see that my hare and fox merely have simple dark rounded feet. Their sitting or standing positions mean that you only really see the top of their feet. Of course I could have spent more time on them but I didn’t want to over emphasise their paws and was satisfied with how they looked as they are. Their expressions and character come through enough in their faces and other cute features.

Needle felted bunny IMG_3400

A bit more detail

When it came to the mouse I made for my mum; his little feet were pink and would have looked a little bare with no detail. Again he is standing up so you don’t see his paw pads anyway for his back feet but I decided to add some tiny threads of wool fibre with a thin needle to show that he has separate toes. I also stabbed away to sculpt obvious paw shapes for his ‘hands’; one holds a beautiful flower and the other is pressed against his humble mouse heart to say ‘I love you!’

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Cute paw pads

Sometimes though you will want to do so much more! Have you ever looked in detail at the underneath of bunny paws and considered how absolutely small, perfectly proportioned and adorable they are? When making my bunnies and badgers I just couldn’t resist felting the little details that make them look so much more like real paws and make your friends want to say ‘squee’ 🙂 especially as these sculptures are laying on their backs with feet in the air ready to be cuddled or tickled.

To get ideas for how these should look, google images of paws or look at photos of your own pets. All I did with my bunny here was to just felt little blobs of lighter coloured wool onto the underside of the feet and then add some darker fibres on top as shading/ furry bits to make them look more natural. So simple but effective!

53-Needle felted feet (3.3) 52-Needle felted feet (2.2)

Why not have a go? As you can see in the pictures below, leaving their feet as just rounded shapes would not have had the same affect!

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Tiny toes that bend

For some animals you may want to take it a step further and make some tiny toes. If you have enough patience you can carefully sculpt the toes from making long sausage shapes that you felt firmly together. You can see I did this with my Christmas owl.

owl2

I have found however that using wire makes this much easier, the toes don’t flatten or fray as much, they are stronger, take the weight of the animal’s body better and it also means you can bend the toes to the position you want them to stay in.

Those of you who already make your animals from wrapping wool over a wire armature will likely already know how this is achieved but please do read on in case there is anything you find useful. Those who prefer not to use a wire armature for the main body can still use wire for the feet , why not mix it up a bit?

There are several ways to wrap wool over wire to make tiny toes; one way is to wrap the wool over bare wire (See my video tutorial afterwards to demonstrate this). This works really well especially for animals where you really want the toes as thin as possible and make them taper at the ends or for projects which are on a very tiny scale. (Some people use hot wax to fix the first layer of wool)

Another simple way (and far less messy if using wax!) which I will demonstrate in this tutorial is to felt wool over a pipe cleaner to ensure it says well (which is basically a very thin piece of wire already wrapped in a layer of material such as cotton or chenille). These can be used for feet where toes can be a bit thicker and for medium or larger projects.  I used this method for my guinea pig and Chestnut, my red squirrel. You can see that I  also added a bit of paw detail on to the guinea pig afterwards.

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2014-02-10 22.25.29 46-Needle felted squirrel (62) 50-Needle felted feet (5)

Step by step guide for felting feet with tiny wired toes

I will demonstrate here how I made Chestnut’s feet. I decided that each foot would have four toes. My guinea pig however had three toes at the back and four at the front like a real guinea pig. You can decide what you think looks best!

What you will need:

  • Pipe cleaners (I bought 30cm length cotton ones)
  • Scissors to cut the pipe cleaners to size
  • Wool (I used merino wool which felts well and is soft to touch)
  • Barbed needles (thinner ones are best for tiniest toes)
  • Felting pad/brush (to prevent you from stabbing your knees)
  • Lots of love and patience and time – this is worth the effort believe me! 🙂

1) Cut two lengths of pipe cleaner for each of your feet (I measured one twice the length of my index finger and the other slighter shorter) It is easier to make two toes from one piece. Prepare these for both feet at the same time.

17-Needle felted feet (12) 18-Needle felted feet (13)

2) Take a thin piece of wool measuring at least one and half times the length of the pipe cleaner and roughly a finger’s width.

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3) Tightly wrap the wool over each length of pipe cleaner; keep the wool flat and wind around, carefully overlapping the previously wrapped fibres all the way along. You can start at the end but I prefer to go from the middle and work to each end.

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The tighter and smoother you wrap the less felting will be needed later on to fix it in place.

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4) On reaching the ends tightly fold the fibres over the end, hold a finger over the end to keep in place whilst overlapping the work you have done very tightly for a few wraps back the other way towards the middle until you reach the end of your wool. Pull off any excess wool if you find you have too much (you don’t want to make the toes too thick).

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5) Using your barbed needle, stab the fibres in place along the length of the structure and especially at the ends to secure them and prevent them from fraying, taking care not to break your needle by hitting the wire as you go.

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6) Bend the pieces in half and then overlay, squeeze and slightly twist the bases of the two toe pairs together, the two longer pieces will become the two centre toes.

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7) Wrap some thicker wool over the twisted section to form the rest of the foot. Spread out the toes into the position you wish them to be in.

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8) Add more wool and felt onto the foot on both sides to shape the foot, and ensure you fill in between the toes and make the ‘knuckle area’ thicker. See how your tiny toes are becoming reality ? 🙂

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9) Build up layers of wool. Your cute little feet are beginning to really take shape!

For the hind feet you will see I kept the toes and foot fairly flat and long and built up a heel. One of the toes ended up a little longer but I quite like this; gives a more natural look.

35-Needle felted feet (30) 34-Needle felted feet (29)

For the front paws (which will be holding a felted acorn) I kept them daintier and shorter and curled the ‘fingers’ into a gripping position, and added an ‘arm’.

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10) Keep going and ensure you have left some loosely felted wool where the foot/leg will join onto the body. See here for a tutorial on how to add head and limbs to animals.

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and …. SQUEEE!

Did you find this tutorial helpful? What would you like to learn about next? Please leave comments. Why not post a photo of your own creations?

For more tutorials like this please visit my Tutorials, tips and ideas page.

Don’t ever miss out on my latest tutorials! Insert your email address and click the ‘Follow’ button on the right hand panel to receive notifications of when the next post is up..:-)

Don’t have time to make one but would love a one of a kind needle felted animal by Fit to be loved for yourself or for that special someone? Visit my Etsy shop today to see my latest creations. Or like my facebook page to see what I am making next.

How to add head and limbs onto needle felted animals

“How do I felt body parts onto my needle felted animal? How can I make them stay secure and not easily pull off?”

Today I want to show you some more basics of needle felting animals. In my other tutorials you will see how to make various animal parts e.g a badger head, bunny ears as well as the various stages of felting a full guinea pig, bunny etc. However one of my followers commented that it would be good to do a tutorial showing how to felt the head and limbs onto your animal. It is not so easy to demonstrate with photos but I have done my best by using the shots I took along the way when sculpting Chestnut; the little red squirrel I made.

There are many ways of felting one piece to another so you may have already found the best way for you. The method I will show you is just one way and was the easiest for my squirrel at the time. 🙂

Please note that the following tutorial will assume you know a little bit about needle felting already. See basics here.

Adding the head

01-Needle felted squirrel (5)

At this point I have felted the head more or less to completion. The body has its shape but no fur yet…

I have sometimes only got as far as the shape of the head when joining it to the body but I quite often find that it’s the head of an animal that gives its unique soulful character (especially once it has eyes).02-Needle felted squirrel (8)

I often don’t decide on exactly how the body will look until I have the head sorted. Being delighted by the cute nature of the face (as is what happened with Chestnut) often inspires me to continue on with the rest of the body. 

1) To join two felted objects together leave enough loose fibre on at least one of the objects where the join will be so that it can be felted into the other.

14-Needle felted squirrel (27)

It is a lot harder and perhaps impossible to join them if the wool is felted too firmly and the fibres cannot mix and bind with the fibres on the other object when you stab with your needle. 

As you can see, the neck at the top of Chestnut’s torso has been left loose and soft. The base of the head is soft to medium felted rather than firm to allow plenty of further stabbing..

2) Fluff the fibres up a bit before putting the head into the position you would like it to be. 

15-Needle felted squirrel (28)

3) Stab at the wool from a 45 degree angle under the chin of the animal. In effect what you are doing is poking the loose wool from the neck into the head. Insert the needle as deep as it can go and on all sides of the neck. This helps to anchor the head to the body. Remember (particularly at this stage when the head will just fall off the body if you try any other way) to lay your animal on a felting pad/brush and stab away from your fingers!

17-Needle felted squirrel (30)19-Needle felted squirrel (32)

To join body parts I use a medium width barbed needle (I find these are stronger than the finer ones for this purpose but do try out various ones to see what you are comfortable with and what works best for the wool and size of animal you are felting). If possible use one with many barbs along the length to help bind the fibres and as the needle will be inserted quite deep.

4) Once it feels like the wool fibres have attached so much so that the head no longer topples away, you can try felting at other angles at various depths. Here I laid Chestnut’s head over the edge of the felting pad as it made it easier to get the angle I wanted and also prevented me from squishing her carefully felted nose 🙂

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22-Needle felted squirrel (35)

5) Carefully stab a few times from the top of the head to ensure it is firmly secure. NB this is easier if the head has no fur yet but if you have (like I have) you just have to take care not to leave stab marks in the face (as you are using a slightly thicker needle).

…and there we go, head on …looking more squirrel-like although much like a shawn sheep at the moment with lack of fur 🙂

25-Needle felted squirrel (38) 24-Needle felted squirrel (37)27-Needle felted squirrel (40)

Adding limbs

This is achieved in much the same way as joining the head in that you need to stab deeply in all directions to ensure all the fibres bind to each other.

For Chestnut I started with the hind legs so that it would be easier to see how her forelegs would be positioned once she was sat upright. Note the thigh part of the leg for my squirrel has already been sculpted as part of her body shape which ends up in a sitting pose. So when I refer to adding the hind leg, it is in fact the section below her thigh bone. 

1) Needle felt each leg onto the body by stabbing the wool at the fluffed up end of the leg into the body.

28-Needle felted squirrel (41)       30-Needle felted squirrel (44)

For Chestnut I had formed her feet using wool wrapped and felted over wire (see my tutorial on tiny feet and toes here) so I had to take extra care not to break my needle by hitting the wire when stabbing.

31-Needle felted squirrel (45)        29-Needle felted squirrel (42)

2) Continue at all angles for both legs until firmly and securely in position.

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08-Needle felted squirrel (17)  09-Needle felted squirrel (18)

Once in place I added more wool round the joins as fur and then decided to felt some of Chestnut’s back-fur too. Aw she is looking very happy and mischievous already!

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3) Then do the same for the forelegs.

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04-Needle felted squirrel (13)  03-Needle felted squirrel (12)

As the shoulder part needs to be attached along the side of the torso it is not sufficient to merely stab from the outer side at the shoulder blade to keep the limb in place.

To felt at an angle under the ‘armpit’ and also to ensure the leg cannot pull away at the join, stuff some extra(fluffed up) wool into the join and stab it securely into place (not too deep to push the lighter coloured wool through to the other side of the shoulder).

36-Needle felted squirrel (51) 35-Needle felted squirrel (50)

Tip: To get the correct positioning and symmetry when adding the second foreleg(as quite often you will want to play around with this until you get it right) you may find it easier to stab the second leg into place only a tiny bit at first; enough to hold the leg in place but not so much that you can’t alter the position if you need to. You can then step away to view your animal from a distance, then adjust until happy with it.

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38-Needle felted squirrel (53) 40-Needle felted squirrel (55)

….then secure into place.

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Once all limbs are joined onto your animal you can then felt over the joins with fur. You wouldn’t even know your animal started out as separate appendages.

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Here is Chestnut as she looks now! 🙂

46-Needle felted squirrel (62) 47-Needle felted squirrel (63)

Needle felted squirrel

I finished my little red squirrel last night. Her name is chestnut (because of her colouring). She is needle felted with a blend of soft merino and corriedale wools with wire inside her tiny toes and the centre of her beautiful fluffy tail so it can bend. She even has a felted acorn which she looks to be enjoying! She is quite small as you can see from the pic of me holding her but lots of detail and of course fit to be loved and full of character.. I so want to get some pictures of her in trees in the park but it is cold windy and raining out so an indoor setting will have to do for now. I hope you like her… I will be adding a tutorial this weekend of how to attach head and limbs with chestnut as my demo. 🙂

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How to needle felt animal eyes

“So, I just about know how to needle felt a cute fluffy animal but how do I even start to needle felt its eyes? How can I make the eyes look 3D, shiny and realistic and not too cartoon-like?’, I could use glass or plastic eyes but would love to use wool so that my sculpture is totally needle felted- so what do I do?”

This photo tutorial will hopefully show you the basics of needle felting animal eyes and give you some ideas along the way too.

Adding the eyes to any needle felted piece is actually one of my favourite parts. It brings the animal to life and gives it its soulful character. Getting the eyes just right shouldn’t be a stress! it can take some practice but it can be so rewarding adding that final detail to your newly created animal…

Here are some of the eyes I have needle felted so far to give you some ideas.

1-eye collage

Can you work out what animals they are?

So here is how you can get started…

Step 1: Look at photos of eyes and get to know basic eye anatomy

Of course eyes are different for every species so the first thing to do is to take a look at photos of real animals to see how big the eyes are in proportion to the animal’s head, decide on colour, the shape, note where the light reflects etc. You don’t want to make the wrong sort of eyes for your animal (eg a cat’s eye on a mouse for example). I usually just do a web search and bookmark the pictures or pin them on pinterest to refer to whilst I needle felt.

Remember doing biology? well you don’t need to know full anatomy of the eye but knowing your basic parts does help. Here is an eye of a needle felted hare I made;

eye anatomy

You will find that most animals will have a pupil which can change in size depending on mood/ light exposure. For some it will be round or it can be different in shape e.g. a slit for cats and reptiles, square for a goat, even w-shaped in a cuttlefish!! Some have a distinctly coloured iris, some have eye lids some don’t- birds’ eyes face forward rather than sit on the side of the head… aren’t animals remarkable!

Step 2: Go for it

For demonstration purposes I will show you the stages that took place when making eyes for a mouse and then a badger. Eyes can be added early on or at the end, it’s completely up to you. I sometimes like to do mine near the end and when finished I can’t help but smile! 🙂

Some ‘Fit to be loved’ eye felting tips

  • use a fine barbed needle for detail
  • use warm hands to roll the tiny eye ball to keep rounded/oval rather than stabbing too much as this will just flatten it
  • it is easier to layer eyes parts on top of each other rather than try to make the exact shape (see what I mean below)
  • do each stage for each eye at the same time to get the eyes the same
  • measure using string/thread/fingers to check eyes are of equal size and symmetrically positioned
  • to attach eye to the head stab mainly around the edge of the eye in various directions rather than across the middle to keep the eye plump and prevent it from going too flat

Mouse eyes (-basic level)

  • roll in warm hands 2 equal sized rugby ball shaped balls of black wool to form the basic eye shape. Lightly needle felt in different directions then place on the mouse head viewing from the top to check the positioning is symmetrical. The eyes on this mouse are simple to view as they contrast well in colour with the rest of its face fur.

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  • firmly felt the wool into place by stabbing around the edge of the shape to keep the eye plump and not completely flat

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  • use a smaller amount of wool for each of the eye irises (using a grey/green colour) and again stab them into place, being careful not to flatten the eye too much…

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  • add a tiny ball of the black to the top of the iris to form the pupil. The position of the pupil will determine the way the mouse looks at you; for this little mouse the pupil at the top gives the impression that he is looking up. Ensure the pupils match in size and position on each eye (you don’t want him to look cross-eyed unless that is the expression you are after..)

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  • adding the pupil in this way i.e. layering one circular shape over another is far easier and less tedious than attempting to shape the iris in a half moon shape and also gives the eye a fuller shape..

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  • take a thin strip of cream-coloured wool to form the edge of the mouse’s eyelids (top and bottom) which nicely frame the eyes. View the eyes from the top to ensure they are in the correct position and of correct thickness

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  • this is also a good time to manipulate the wool on the eyes as well as around the eyes with your fingers to make the shape of the eyes fit the face as best it can. For example you could pull in the bottom corners of the eyes and narrow the bridge of the nose slightly if you choose to do so or if one eye sticks out more than the other you can carefully push it in slightly.

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  • as a finishing touch and to bring the eyes to life and make them look 3D and shiny, add a tiny dot of white to give the illusion that light is reflecting across the eye surface. The exact position of this is not so crucial as getting them in the same mirrored position for each eye…

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Here is the finished mouse saying ‘I love you’ with it’s cute yellow felted flower…

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Badger eyes (- intermediate level)

The badger’s eyes are slightly harder to create. The reason being is that the badger’s dark eyes are hard to see on a fairly dark face so needing more careful measuring to ensure both eyes look the same. The eyes are mainly dark so need more help in making the surface look like it is shiny and reflecting the light. I also add colour to the bottom corner of each eye to form what is known as the ‘lacrimal caruncle’ that you sometimes see in mammals such as a badger (to make it look even more life like)

  • roll 2 small balls of black wool in warm hands and needle felt lightly in all directions

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  • add the balls to the badger head, felting slightly to keep in place but don’t felt firmly until you have checked they are positioned correctly

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  • whilst they are roughly in place view the eyes from above to check the position. As the background fur is very dark too, you may find this hard to do so you may wish to feel the eyes too to check this..as you can see the left eye was slightly higher at this stage so I moved the eye down slightly to match..

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  • once happy with the positioning, felt around the edge of each shape, not across its middle, to ensure the eye does not become too flat.

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  • take a thin length of grey wool for the top and bottom eyelid edges for each eye, these will nicely frame the eyes.

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  • needle felt these into place and then view both eyes from the top to ensure they are in the correct position and of correct thickness

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  • add a tiny amount of brown wool into the inner eye corners (the ‘lacrimal caruncle’) – this was the same colour as the brown detail on the badger nose

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  • the eyes of the badger are very dark so as well as having a tiny white spot to give the illusion of a shiny eye as with the mouse, I wanted to add some grey to the sides of each black eye for extra 3D light reflecting effect.

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  • it is very important to ensure that what you do with one eye is mirrored with the other so checking from all angles is crucial.

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  • and add the white dot…

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Yes these eyes can take a while to get just right but oh how cute do these badgers look when finished!!

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Did you find this tutorial helpful? What would you like to learn about next? Please leave comments. Why not post a photo of your own creations?

For more tutorials like this please visit my Tutorials, tips and ideas page.

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Don’t have time to make one but would love a one of a kind needle felted animal by Fit to be loved for yourself or for that special someone? Visit my Etsy shop today to see my latest creations. Or like my facebook page to see what I am making next.

Christmas hare

So today I went to my sister’s house for our second Christmas dinner. (Well for my family it was but for me it was actually my first as Christmas day I was unfortunately very sick and had to stay in bed most of the day to recover and managed to eat only 2 savoury crackers).

Feeling much better now after great company, delicious food and watching the old Back to the Future films and the Snowman and the snow dog.

I made this little hare for my sister for Christmas so couldn’t wait for her to open up her ribbon wrapped box after dinner to find out what was inside.

My sister really loves hares. She has several ornaments already and a big picture of one on the wall of her lounge.

As usual I googled photos of real hares as well as bronze and clay sculptures for inspiration and created this chocolate brown hare with champagne cream detail. To give him lots of character and bring him to life I have ensured he has big alluring eyes and one ear that lops down ever so slightly compared to the other as his head tilts to the side.

She loves him 🙂 Hope you like him too..

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Happy Christmas everyone!

Happy Christmas everyone!

I  just wanted to say a very Merry Christmas to all my followers!

May this coming year be full of wonderful surprises for you and hopes truly becoming reality!

I have had a little go at making a Christmas poster from a photo of my original badger for you all.

Enjoy the festivities, have fun and watch out for a new year of more lovable creations from Fit to be loved! 🙂

God bless you all

Amanda xx

 

Ps If you haven’t already added your email address to receive updates of new exciting posts please just click on the ‘follow’ button on the right hand side of my ‘find out more’ page.

Winter woodland tree decorations!

Winter woodland tree decorations!

Christmas is just around the corner …wow  where did that year go?… it really flew by!!

So I am getting busy and making these little cuties to hang on the tree! I love everything about the woodland theme this year – so wanted to mix woodland with a splash of Christmas fun and sparkle.

So here they are ..handmade winter woodland themed tree decorations,   brought to you by ‘Fit to be loved’ this Christmas. Please note I will be making limited numbers as I have only one pair of hands so order them while you can..

They come as a set of 3 –  sparkle toadstool; sleepy winter fox (with crocheted scarf); and Christmas owl…

They are £9 each or buy the set for £25. They are now up on my Etsy shop so don’t miss out…

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For updates on latest Fit to be loved felt products and new tutorials sign up to receive email alerts here (just click ‘follow’ on the right hand panel)…

Beside quiet waters (landscape felting ideas)

Felting is relaxing and fun especially when shared!!

Last week I travelled back to where I grew up; Grantham in South Lincolnshire, to spend a week with my family and catch up with old friends.

I had a relaxing time away from my office job, walked the quaint streets of Stamford and visited the home of the Bakewell pudding in the Peak District. And… you may have guessed  –  (as I am quite addicted to my felting)-  that I also took some of my wools with me to get on with my latest creation.

I also had the opportunity to spend one of my days showing my mum some basic needle felting techniques. Felting is not just for times alone just you, the wool and needles and your imagination but is so much fun to do with others – especially for friendship craft days, and in my case family time! for me and my mum, together sharing quality time. 🙂

Haha, my dad peered in from time to time and watched and enjoyed the artistic flair (claiming I got it all from him). They are both artistic!    I think we all can be in so many different ways!

My week was sooooo relaxing and quiet away from the hustle and bustle of the city and work. Home cooked food and love and hugs and then some felting (of course)- all I could wish for in a holiday.

So I wanted to show you some pictures of my mum’s very first landscape piece. My mum is a painter and loves going to her art class each week and produces some beautiful water colour paintings. She loves using colour and really appreciates nature just like me which is illustrated in her work!

So here we go, she needed no help from me after I showed her a few basic hints. I think it is really great. My mum used soft luxurious merino wool from World of wool.

I have named it ‘Beside quiet waters’ as it reminds me of David’s Psalm 23 in the bible and really sums up my week with them. Thanks mum for our time together!

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Mum then painted the sky onto her canvas and stuck the felted piece onto it…. beautiful!!

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Of course on leaving to come back to London I left some wools and some needles with mum.. can’t wait to see what she makes next…

Gift wrap ideas

Today I want to inspire you with some gift wrapping ideas. I am sure you will agree that packaging is just as important as the product inside.  Presenting your hours of work beautifully in something it deserves…not in a plain boring or tacky wrap or one that shows no effort was made…

But how could my Fit to be loved creations be gift wrapped in Fit to be loved packaging and at an affordable price?

It is really all down to your imagination and what you can get your hands on.

You could buy boxes and luxurious materials but the expense could really soon add up.

What I want to show you today is how I have been reusing basic brown cardboard boxes (in fact the outer packaging from the crickets I buy on line for my geckos) and upcycling them by adding ribbons, doilies, felt/ polystyrene shapes, string/ twine etc

Here is my most recent box….

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So simple yet looks lovely!

You can get everything you need for way under a pound for each box if you look in charity shops, car boot sales and cheap stores like pound land, Tiger, Wilkinsons, the Works, sales at greeting card shops…. and the experience of grabbing a bargain is far too much fun to miss out on too!!!

Be creative not just in what you make but in how you package it. Wow your customers or bring a tear to a loved one’s eyes when giving them a gift from the heart…

So here are some more ideas to get you started…

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Remember not to overload but keep simple, colourful and imaginative. That personal touch goes a long way…:-)

Let me know what you think….

If you are buying a bespoke felted animal or accessory from my Etsy shop…let me know what colours you like and I will ensure the gift wrap matches up.:-)

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